“This bright, wet, dazzling confusion of shape and shadow, of reality and reflection, will appeal strongly to any one with the transcendental instinct about this dreamy and dual life of ours. It will always give a man the strange sense of looking down at the skies,” G. K. Chesterton wrote in an essay defending rain. Chesterton’s insistent curiosity for the reflection encouraged by rain, for the form and shadow which are, and which show us, alternate realities (perhaps due to their clear celestial quality), reminds us that the phenomenon, somewhere between the meteorological and the mystical, has fascinated every culture around the world. Recall that there are no less than 50 words in Japanese for rain.

To similar ends, the Roman photographer, Alessio Trerotoli recently produced a series of works called Raindrop Blues, a collection of images in which the mere presence of rain alters reality to the extent that it takes on an immaterial, nearly dreamlike quality. To achieve such an effect, the artist merges multiple photographs resulting in an imperceptible collage. And this, among other things, creates a reflection on the alienation and loneliness of large cities and the characters who, beyond simply appearing beneath the rain, also seem profoundly alone.

By necessity, the name of the series refers to the blues, a musical genre whose very essence touches on sadness, like drops of rain. “Like a blues song, they fall with a repetitive but fascinating rhythm, awakening, as they were called in the 17th-century, the ‘blue demons’ – a suffused sensation of melancholia,” Trerotoli explains. What he portrays, above all, is a veiled melancholy, lost in the many layers intuited through the images, like a sadness never fully taking shape, but which is there, latent, in everyday life.

Trerotoli’s are not street photographs. In his imagery, rain allows for the emergence of a portrait exceeding the common, and promising a strangely deep approach to the streets, to people, objects, and to buildings. As in an impressionist landscape, layers of reality are simultaneously reflected, even as the sky reaches the ground.

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Images: Alessio Trerotoli

“This bright, wet, dazzling confusion of shape and shadow, of reality and reflection, will appeal strongly to any one with the transcendental instinct about this dreamy and dual life of ours. It will always give a man the strange sense of looking down at the skies,” G. K. Chesterton wrote in an essay defending rain. Chesterton’s insistent curiosity for the reflection encouraged by rain, for the form and shadow which are, and which show us, alternate realities (perhaps due to their clear celestial quality), reminds us that the phenomenon, somewhere between the meteorological and the mystical, has fascinated every culture around the world. Recall that there are no less than 50 words in Japanese for rain.

To similar ends, the Roman photographer, Alessio Trerotoli recently produced a series of works called Raindrop Blues, a collection of images in which the mere presence of rain alters reality to the extent that it takes on an immaterial, nearly dreamlike quality. To achieve such an effect, the artist merges multiple photographs resulting in an imperceptible collage. And this, among other things, creates a reflection on the alienation and loneliness of large cities and the characters who, beyond simply appearing beneath the rain, also seem profoundly alone.

By necessity, the name of the series refers to the blues, a musical genre whose very essence touches on sadness, like drops of rain. “Like a blues song, they fall with a repetitive but fascinating rhythm, awakening, as they were called in the 17th-century, the ‘blue demons’ – a suffused sensation of melancholia,” Trerotoli explains. What he portrays, above all, is a veiled melancholy, lost in the many layers intuited through the images, like a sadness never fully taking shape, but which is there, latent, in everyday life.

Trerotoli’s are not street photographs. In his imagery, rain allows for the emergence of a portrait exceeding the common, and promising a strangely deep approach to the streets, to people, objects, and to buildings. As in an impressionist landscape, layers of reality are simultaneously reflected, even as the sky reaches the ground.

trerotoli9
trerotoli8 
trerotoli7
trerotoli6
trerotoli5ç
trerotoli4 
trerotoli3
trerotoli2
trerotoli10
 

 

 

Images: Alessio Trerotoli