For many of us, travelling around the world visiting notable locations is a desire whose materialisation is somewhat uncertain. Undoubtedly, we all want to visit those places that will expand our physical, emotional and mental horizons. However, unfortunately, some of them could be on the brink of extinction.

These places could easily be conceived as living beings, thus subjected to vital processes that include death. The following infographic, presented by Daily Infographic, shows us 10 places that will hardly withstand the passing of the following 100 years —as well as specifying the lurking threats they face.

At the top of the list we have the Galapagos Islands, characterised by the unparalleled biodiversity that awed Darwin. Next are the Maldives, 960 islands most of which are less than a metre high and surrounded by the bluest and most crystalline of oceans. The third place is the Australian Coral Barrier, the only living entity that can be seen from space.

The following 4 places include Venice, the spectacular Italian port, whose cultural archive is unique, and which will probably cease to exist in the following year. Similarly, the Dead Sea, the saltiest body of water in the world, as well as the elegant glaciers of the Alps, could vanish in 50 years’ time. The forests of Madagascar, the fourth largest island on Earth, also face a possible extinction, but unlike the previous three places, its fate could be changed by true and committed conservation efforts.

Lastly, the three places we should visit in the next 25 years (as eco-friendly tourists), are the Congo Basin, one of the most encompassing forests on the planet —which occupies 10 million acres and 7 countries—, the National Glacier Park in North America, that has over 200 waterfalls, 712 lakes and innumerable animal species and, finally, the Taj Mahal —sublime palace found in Northern India. This “New Wonder of the World”, could close to the public in 5 years, in order to guarantee its conservation.

Perhaps this infographic’s true value is that it reminds us of the fragility of the world that surrounds us, while simultaneously encouraging us to experience these marvels in person. However, it also warns us that changing their fate is solely in our hands. Experiencing them goes beyond seeing them, it involves being responsible and respectful. Travelling has the potential to transform us, and stimulate us, but only if we can appreciate that these systems depend on us, as much as we depend on them.

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10-places-640x5378

For many of us, travelling around the world visiting notable locations is a desire whose materialisation is somewhat uncertain. Undoubtedly, we all want to visit those places that will expand our physical, emotional and mental horizons. However, unfortunately, some of them could be on the brink of extinction.

These places could easily be conceived as living beings, thus subjected to vital processes that include death. The following infographic, presented by Daily Infographic, shows us 10 places that will hardly withstand the passing of the following 100 years —as well as specifying the lurking threats they face.

At the top of the list we have the Galapagos Islands, characterised by the unparalleled biodiversity that awed Darwin. Next are the Maldives, 960 islands most of which are less than a metre high and surrounded by the bluest and most crystalline of oceans. The third place is the Australian Coral Barrier, the only living entity that can be seen from space.

The following 4 places include Venice, the spectacular Italian port, whose cultural archive is unique, and which will probably cease to exist in the following year. Similarly, the Dead Sea, the saltiest body of water in the world, as well as the elegant glaciers of the Alps, could vanish in 50 years’ time. The forests of Madagascar, the fourth largest island on Earth, also face a possible extinction, but unlike the previous three places, its fate could be changed by true and committed conservation efforts.

Lastly, the three places we should visit in the next 25 years (as eco-friendly tourists), are the Congo Basin, one of the most encompassing forests on the planet —which occupies 10 million acres and 7 countries—, the National Glacier Park in North America, that has over 200 waterfalls, 712 lakes and innumerable animal species and, finally, the Taj Mahal —sublime palace found in Northern India. This “New Wonder of the World”, could close to the public in 5 years, in order to guarantee its conservation.

Perhaps this infographic’s true value is that it reminds us of the fragility of the world that surrounds us, while simultaneously encouraging us to experience these marvels in person. However, it also warns us that changing their fate is solely in our hands. Experiencing them goes beyond seeing them, it involves being responsible and respectful. Travelling has the potential to transform us, and stimulate us, but only if we can appreciate that these systems depend on us, as much as we depend on them.

.

10-places-640x5378

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