How does one explain to kids that they’re made up of the same stuff as the stars? How does one convey the rhythmic perfection with which these millions of bodies and forces coexist? How does one reveal the intimate relationship between what happens up there with what we see down here?

That new generations establish a true communion with their environment is essential. To achieve this, an understanding of astronomy is an important ally. What better way to acquire perspective of our own personal journeys is there than to confirm that we’re all part of a larger whole? That alone is reason enough for celebrating Astronomy for Kids, an online astronomical guide for children.

The platform provides a pleasant introduction to the science of the stars, and invites kids to observe, recognize, and learn their names. It’s the perfect place for presenting the cosmos to kids, while making them aware and facilitating their understanding.

Remember that learning astronomy isn’t just a fascinating process and a fundamentally aesthetic experience. The process also implies valuable lessons and revelations: of identity and collectivity, of enjoyment, and of responsibility that needs to be cultivated before the cosmos. The universe is our home and, more importantly, we are the universe. Understanding this, that we’re part of something infinite and perfect, is an essential step toward understanding ourselves as a species, and a step which puts our relationship with the environment into a completely different perspective.

Those who are children today will inherit a landscape beset with challenges, some of them extremely complex. To collaborate on their mission, we need to provide them with some of the essential tools. Teaching astronomy to kids is one of those tools and one which helps us to reimagine our relationship with our surroundings (whether they’re one centimeter away, or several light years).

Contact with and awareness of the cosmos and its imposing beauty may well change Earth’s future and the futures of all those who inhabit it, and those who will inhabit it, too.  

Image: Bart Everson – flickr

How does one explain to kids that they’re made up of the same stuff as the stars? How does one convey the rhythmic perfection with which these millions of bodies and forces coexist? How does one reveal the intimate relationship between what happens up there with what we see down here?

That new generations establish a true communion with their environment is essential. To achieve this, an understanding of astronomy is an important ally. What better way to acquire perspective of our own personal journeys is there than to confirm that we’re all part of a larger whole? That alone is reason enough for celebrating Astronomy for Kids, an online astronomical guide for children.

The platform provides a pleasant introduction to the science of the stars, and invites kids to observe, recognize, and learn their names. It’s the perfect place for presenting the cosmos to kids, while making them aware and facilitating their understanding.

Remember that learning astronomy isn’t just a fascinating process and a fundamentally aesthetic experience. The process also implies valuable lessons and revelations: of identity and collectivity, of enjoyment, and of responsibility that needs to be cultivated before the cosmos. The universe is our home and, more importantly, we are the universe. Understanding this, that we’re part of something infinite and perfect, is an essential step toward understanding ourselves as a species, and a step which puts our relationship with the environment into a completely different perspective.

Those who are children today will inherit a landscape beset with challenges, some of them extremely complex. To collaborate on their mission, we need to provide them with some of the essential tools. Teaching astronomy to kids is one of those tools and one which helps us to reimagine our relationship with our surroundings (whether they’re one centimeter away, or several light years).

Contact with and awareness of the cosmos and its imposing beauty may well change Earth’s future and the futures of all those who inhabit it, and those who will inhabit it, too.  

Image: Bart Everson – flickr