To speak about gardens leads, sooner or later, to speaking about Japanese gardening. In Japan, as we know, there has existed a profound tradition of garden cultivation for centuries, intimately related to the development of religion in their culture. In this sense, Japanese gardens have reflected the cosmovision of doctrines such as Shintoism and Buddhism, and even traditions of a Chinese origin such as Geomancy and Feng Shui.

Hence, halfway between adoration and contemplation, mimesis and transcendence, the Japanese garden sets itself apart for its careful selection and the arrangement of its elements, the richness of meaning they both individually and collectively have, but especially due to the harmony they transmit to whoever strolls through their lakes, rocks and bonsais; to whoever halts on their bridges to admire the koi fish that make the surface of the water iridescent; whoever follows with his or her gaze the flight of the birds that inevitably become part of the happening of the garden in time.

Fortunately for us, the Japanese garden is not exclusive to Japan. A privilege of Porteños and travelers, in Buenos Aires there is a notable example of how a tradition can be transported to an unexpected part of the world and find a favorable land.

Originally, the Japanese Garden of Buenos Aires was built on the occasion of the visit of the then-heir to the throne Akihito and his wife Michiko to the Argentinian capital in 1967. In 1997 they both returned, but this time baring the titles of emperor and empress. The place became a symbol of communion between both countries. The garden in Buenos Aires figures as the largest Japanese garden outside of Japan.

Greatness, not just of its dimensions but also of its qualities, for it is a space where zeal and detail are combined to gift us an exquisite experience that will hardly cease to influence our days and nights after having paid it a visit.

To speak about gardens leads, sooner or later, to speaking about Japanese gardening. In Japan, as we know, there has existed a profound tradition of garden cultivation for centuries, intimately related to the development of religion in their culture. In this sense, Japanese gardens have reflected the cosmovision of doctrines such as Shintoism and Buddhism, and even traditions of a Chinese origin such as Geomancy and Feng Shui.

Hence, halfway between adoration and contemplation, mimesis and transcendence, the Japanese garden sets itself apart for its careful selection and the arrangement of its elements, the richness of meaning they both individually and collectively have, but especially due to the harmony they transmit to whoever strolls through their lakes, rocks and bonsais; to whoever halts on their bridges to admire the koi fish that make the surface of the water iridescent; whoever follows with his or her gaze the flight of the birds that inevitably become part of the happening of the garden in time.

Fortunately for us, the Japanese garden is not exclusive to Japan. A privilege of Porteños and travelers, in Buenos Aires there is a notable example of how a tradition can be transported to an unexpected part of the world and find a favorable land.

Originally, the Japanese Garden of Buenos Aires was built on the occasion of the visit of the then-heir to the throne Akihito and his wife Michiko to the Argentinian capital in 1967. In 1997 they both returned, but this time baring the titles of emperor and empress. The place became a symbol of communion between both countries. The garden in Buenos Aires figures as the largest Japanese garden outside of Japan.

Greatness, not just of its dimensions but also of its qualities, for it is a space where zeal and detail are combined to gift us an exquisite experience that will hardly cease to influence our days and nights after having paid it a visit.

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