In northern Nebraska, in the United States, there’s an homage to the mythical ruins of Stonehenge in England. A total of 39 old cars, each painted the color of stone, were erected in 1987 as a modern megalithic monument – and as a memorial to the father of the creator, artist Jim Reinders. It’s a place known as Carhenge.

The unique, unusual landscape was chosen as the setting for Stormhenge, a time-lapse video made by the artists collective, Skyglow. Through photographs and videos, the collective has documented the night skies of the United States to raise awareness about light pollution and its effects on, for example, the migratory patterns of animal species and human health, among many others. It’s also, finally, a project to reminds us of the human right to see the stars.

As part of the effort, artists Harun Mehmedinovic and Gavin Heffernan used video from four different recordings made between 2015 and 2017. They capture stunning phenomena such as storms and the most recent eclipse of the sun, as well as shots of stars and constellations.

Among all of the cloud formations and storms, sunrises and sunsets, rays of the sun and shooting stars, along with an epic musical score, the video shows us the sky and its many phenomena while pushing the aesthetic limits of the time-lapse format.

In northern Nebraska, in the United States, there’s an homage to the mythical ruins of Stonehenge in England. A total of 39 old cars, each painted the color of stone, were erected in 1987 as a modern megalithic monument – and as a memorial to the father of the creator, artist Jim Reinders. It’s a place known as Carhenge.

The unique, unusual landscape was chosen as the setting for Stormhenge, a time-lapse video made by the artists collective, Skyglow. Through photographs and videos, the collective has documented the night skies of the United States to raise awareness about light pollution and its effects on, for example, the migratory patterns of animal species and human health, among many others. It’s also, finally, a project to reminds us of the human right to see the stars.

As part of the effort, artists Harun Mehmedinovic and Gavin Heffernan used video from four different recordings made between 2015 and 2017. They capture stunning phenomena such as storms and the most recent eclipse of the sun, as well as shots of stars and constellations.

Among all of the cloud formations and storms, sunrises and sunsets, rays of the sun and shooting stars, along with an epic musical score, the video shows us the sky and its many phenomena while pushing the aesthetic limits of the time-lapse format.