It is no surprise that after so many attempts to explain the function and construction of Stonehenge without a definitive answer having been reached, that there is no reference showing photographs of each stone from direct angles, which would be the most sensible and simplest way.

Stonehenge, without a doubt the most astounding of all megalithic monuments, has put up with all kinds of human legends and ideas, and even though it remains impermeable to all of them, in the collective imagination it has become a complex sum of myths and interpretations. As a result, this news is refreshing: Stones of Stonehenge aims to catalog and physically describe each of the stones that form the imposing circular ruins, in the simplest possible way.

Stones of Stonehenge is still a work in progress. Not all of the rocks have their own page, but they eventually will have. The numeration system for the stones was devised by W.M. Flinders Petrie in the 19th century and remains valid today, according to archeologists and researchers. Petrie decided to number the rocks in ascending order clockwise, from the monument’s central axis, and it appears to work well. Stone number 1 is the one that is immediately east of the axis on the external circle.

The website only shares the physical properties of each of the stones and shows their place in the beautiful megalithic dance and their position with respect to the solstice. Nothing more. It is a good way of familiarizing yourself with the site before visiting, or perhaps the healthiest way of getting to know the formation stone by stone: to one day arrive at that magnificent ‘whole’ framed within a lithic scene to get up close and personal with each of its pieces.

It is no surprise that after so many attempts to explain the function and construction of Stonehenge without a definitive answer having been reached, that there is no reference showing photographs of each stone from direct angles, which would be the most sensible and simplest way.

Stonehenge, without a doubt the most astounding of all megalithic monuments, has put up with all kinds of human legends and ideas, and even though it remains impermeable to all of them, in the collective imagination it has become a complex sum of myths and interpretations. As a result, this news is refreshing: Stones of Stonehenge aims to catalog and physically describe each of the stones that form the imposing circular ruins, in the simplest possible way.

Stones of Stonehenge is still a work in progress. Not all of the rocks have their own page, but they eventually will have. The numeration system for the stones was devised by W.M. Flinders Petrie in the 19th century and remains valid today, according to archeologists and researchers. Petrie decided to number the rocks in ascending order clockwise, from the monument’s central axis, and it appears to work well. Stone number 1 is the one that is immediately east of the axis on the external circle.

The website only shares the physical properties of each of the stones and shows their place in the beautiful megalithic dance and their position with respect to the solstice. Nothing more. It is a good way of familiarizing yourself with the site before visiting, or perhaps the healthiest way of getting to know the formation stone by stone: to one day arrive at that magnificent ‘whole’ framed within a lithic scene to get up close and personal with each of its pieces.

Tagged: , ,