Were there an emphasis, among all the many qualities of The Garden of Earthly Delights, it would need to be the hidden pictorialization of the mysterious. Translating such an epic work has never been easy. In fact, it’s still very likely that rather than reaching an idea of what we ought to believe about it – just about anything not ruled out is but another red herring.

Created by the Flemish painter, Hieronymus Bosch, presumably in the early 16th century, the painting first appeared before the eyes of the inhabitants of the Escorial monastery in 1593. A parade of signs of an unequalled Gothic and theological presence, even the remotest corners of the painting contain an intimate symbolism on the creation and the destiny of its time. It’s a symbolism that relies, notably, on both morality and sin.

A triptych, The Garden of Earthly Delights is split into three stages representing Paradise, Madness and Hell.

A recent initiative took on the unenviable task of creating an interactive documentary work; a map that guides viewers over the pictorial surface. It’s something of a virtual odyssey in which user can see and learn about the development of what is, undoubtedly, one of the most exotic pictorial chronicles in the history of art.

Click here to begin your own memorable immersion.

Were there an emphasis, among all the many qualities of The Garden of Earthly Delights, it would need to be the hidden pictorialization of the mysterious. Translating such an epic work has never been easy. In fact, it’s still very likely that rather than reaching an idea of what we ought to believe about it – just about anything not ruled out is but another red herring.

Created by the Flemish painter, Hieronymus Bosch, presumably in the early 16th century, the painting first appeared before the eyes of the inhabitants of the Escorial monastery in 1593. A parade of signs of an unequalled Gothic and theological presence, even the remotest corners of the painting contain an intimate symbolism on the creation and the destiny of its time. It’s a symbolism that relies, notably, on both morality and sin.

A triptych, The Garden of Earthly Delights is split into three stages representing Paradise, Madness and Hell.

A recent initiative took on the unenviable task of creating an interactive documentary work; a map that guides viewers over the pictorial surface. It’s something of a virtual odyssey in which user can see and learn about the development of what is, undoubtedly, one of the most exotic pictorial chronicles in the history of art.

Click here to begin your own memorable immersion.

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