For Arto Lindsay, an architect of noise and improvised rhythm, contrasting music with regional performance art is essential. Parades and carnivals are his favorite vehicle to reinterpret the musical roots of a culture and to submerge us into the perspectives of other cultures.

While Lindsay’s popularity is due to his multiple musical projects (orchestra director, member of bands such as DNA and No Wave, and collaborator with Laurie Anderson, Matthew Barney, Ryuichi Sakamoto and Caetano Veloso, among others), a decisive facet of his creative career is his involvement in the creation of processions that appeal to the communitarian rite.

To better understand his position, it helps to refer to the ideas of Antonin Artaud, who warns that the cultural identity of a society lies not in its abstractions of “civic nationalism,” but in the force that converges in its popular rites, in the authentic soul of a region. Artaudian nationalism deals with deep culture, which usually involves art as a means of humanization of the context.

An American by birth, Lindsay was raised in the heart of the Tropicalia movement in Brazil during the 1960s, and he was formed musically in the decadent and lucid New York of the 1980s. Through the juxtaposition of musical genres and popular traditions, Lindsay proposes a more conscious musical procession, which doesn’t require academic or historical topics, but which emanates from the collective soul.

To celebrate the opening of the Faena Forum in Miami, in the fall 2016, Arto Lindsay, in the company of designer Gia Wolff and under the direction of Claire Tancons, will explore the cultural ceremony alongside local and international artists and communitarian organization. The event will aim to deconstruct the colonialist concept that states that everything comes from North America, using art as a bridge and connection between different territories. It’s an invitation to reflect on a shift of paradigms in terms of cultural “perspectivism,” all within the inevitable poetic of urban space and everyday life of a city.

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For Arto Lindsay, an architect of noise and improvised rhythm, contrasting music with regional performance art is essential. Parades and carnivals are his favorite vehicle to reinterpret the musical roots of a culture and to submerge us into the perspectives of other cultures.

While Lindsay’s popularity is due to his multiple musical projects (orchestra director, member of bands such as DNA and No Wave, and collaborator with Laurie Anderson, Matthew Barney, Ryuichi Sakamoto and Caetano Veloso, among others), a decisive facet of his creative career is his involvement in the creation of processions that appeal to the communitarian rite.

To better understand his position, it helps to refer to the ideas of Antonin Artaud, who warns that the cultural identity of a society lies not in its abstractions of “civic nationalism,” but in the force that converges in its popular rites, in the authentic soul of a region. Artaudian nationalism deals with deep culture, which usually involves art as a means of humanization of the context.

An American by birth, Lindsay was raised in the heart of the Tropicalia movement in Brazil during the 1960s, and he was formed musically in the decadent and lucid New York of the 1980s. Through the juxtaposition of musical genres and popular traditions, Lindsay proposes a more conscious musical procession, which doesn’t require academic or historical topics, but which emanates from the collective soul.

To celebrate the opening of the Faena Forum in Miami, in the fall 2016, Arto Lindsay, in the company of designer Gia Wolff and under the direction of Claire Tancons, will explore the cultural ceremony alongside local and international artists and communitarian organization. The event will aim to deconstruct the colonialist concept that states that everything comes from North America, using art as a bridge and connection between different territories. It’s an invitation to reflect on a shift of paradigms in terms of cultural “perspectivism,” all within the inevitable poetic of urban space and everyday life of a city.

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