The Library of Congress recently acquired a collection of Carl Sagan’s documents, which includes a list of texts from 1954, when the scientist was still a student. The list contains some philosophical and literary jewels, which we would be wise to include in our personal readings in order to greatly enrich our always-in-process anatomy of knowledge.

In addition to some titles that we’d expect to be on the list of any astrophysicist, Sagan caringly filled his days with literature, philosophy, religion, art and psychology. After all it was he who built the greatest and most stimulating bridge between academia and popular culture. Taking advantage of all the previous subjects, Sagan knew how to transmit the awe he felt for the universe in a completely new manner. His list says a lot about him, we merely have to read some of the titles to outline the narrative of his cognitive cosmos. The list includes:

The Republic by Plato

Julius Ceasar by Shakespeare

Young Archimedes by Huxley

The Immoralist by Andre Gide

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds by Charles Mackay

A History of Western Philosophy by W.T Jones

Timaeus by Plato

Education for freedom by Robert Maynard Hutchins

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The Library of Congress recently acquired a collection of Carl Sagan’s documents, which includes a list of texts from 1954, when the scientist was still a student. The list contains some philosophical and literary jewels, which we would be wise to include in our personal readings in order to greatly enrich our always-in-process anatomy of knowledge.

In addition to some titles that we’d expect to be on the list of any astrophysicist, Sagan caringly filled his days with literature, philosophy, religion, art and psychology. After all it was he who built the greatest and most stimulating bridge between academia and popular culture. Taking advantage of all the previous subjects, Sagan knew how to transmit the awe he felt for the universe in a completely new manner. His list says a lot about him, we merely have to read some of the titles to outline the narrative of his cognitive cosmos. The list includes:

The Republic by Plato

Julius Ceasar by Shakespeare

Young Archimedes by Huxley

The Immoralist by Andre Gide

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds by Charles Mackay

A History of Western Philosophy by W.T Jones

Timaeus by Plato

Education for freedom by Robert Maynard Hutchins

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