Few events in life have the ability to astonish us as much as looking up and seeing the celestial vault of a medieval European cathedral. The ethereal magic and mathematical precision leave one engrossed, feeling both small and belonging at the same time. This is what photographer David Stephenson shows us in his series Heavenly Vaults, in which he captures over 80 Gothic and Romanesque vaults in kaleidoscopic photographs that reveal their complex geometrics, their decorative details and paintings in and absolute and breathtaking manner.

Celestial vaults, as the utmost representation of sacred geometry also symbolise the metaphysical principle of the inseparable relation between the part and the whole –– The relation, in other words, between the number, its measure and creation. It’s as if these constructions were an eye into the original matrix from where all codes and possibilities rhythmically soar.

The order of sublime architecture pleas to an intuitive and non-verbal understanding, in which the geometric speaks as an aleph would. Sacred geometry, like good music, expedites the soul’s evolution, Miranda Lundy once said.

In his stunning book, Stephenson explores not only the sublime architecture of the vaults and the intersection between art and mathematics, but also the emotional resonance and sense of freedom one experiences before one of these constructions. And even if they are only photographs, the series gives us a precise impression of what it would feel like to be beneath those domes. The spiritual meaning of the symmetry seeps from the photographs. It would seem that the vaults’ architects wanted to encode God in stone for posterity.

Einstein once remarked that science, religion and other arts are branches from the same tree. These vaults endorse this.

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Few events in life have the ability to astonish us as much as looking up and seeing the celestial vault of a medieval European cathedral. The ethereal magic and mathematical precision leave one engrossed, feeling both small and belonging at the same time. This is what photographer David Stephenson shows us in his series Heavenly Vaults, in which he captures over 80 Gothic and Romanesque vaults in kaleidoscopic photographs that reveal their complex geometrics, their decorative details and paintings in and absolute and breathtaking manner.

Celestial vaults, as the utmost representation of sacred geometry also symbolise the metaphysical principle of the inseparable relation between the part and the whole –– The relation, in other words, between the number, its measure and creation. It’s as if these constructions were an eye into the original matrix from where all codes and possibilities rhythmically soar.

The order of sublime architecture pleas to an intuitive and non-verbal understanding, in which the geometric speaks as an aleph would. Sacred geometry, like good music, expedites the soul’s evolution, Miranda Lundy once said.

In his stunning book, Stephenson explores not only the sublime architecture of the vaults and the intersection between art and mathematics, but also the emotional resonance and sense of freedom one experiences before one of these constructions. And even if they are only photographs, the series gives us a precise impression of what it would feel like to be beneath those domes. The spiritual meaning of the symmetry seeps from the photographs. It would seem that the vaults’ architects wanted to encode God in stone for posterity.

Einstein once remarked that science, religion and other arts are branches from the same tree. These vaults endorse this.

.

heavenlyvaults3

heavenlyvaults7

heavenlyvaults2

heavenlyvaults8

heavenlyvaults1

heavenlyvaults6

heavenlyvaults4

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