In a memorable conversation celebrated in Paris, his second home, David Lynch invites us to go over 99 of his favourite photographs and treats us with his commentary. This practice, in which acclaimed personalities choose 99 images for a book compilation, was part of the 15th anniversary of Paris Photo, celebrated at the Grand Palais.

There are few choices better than David Lynch for this purpose. As is shown in the video, while observing an image, Lynch’s imagination is to the brim with richness. The film director can imagine whole stories from a single image, revealing a guide of sorts to what is surely his creative process when visualising a film: subtle signs, provocative gestures, what lies behind the walls, in the darkness or even the life behind a staring face.

Lynch never stops constructing narratives; even from the juxtaposed images for the Paris Photo Bank, he knits a cinematic sequence between them. He basks in joy with the descriptions: “I love organic phenomenon, the flesh, the play of light.”, he says while contemplating what appears to be a swollen limb. The film-maker, who has also designed a Parisian nightclub, shares his love for curtains: “because they hide things, this is the fascination with theatres, they open and close, revealing the world.”

The last image in the book shows us his fondness for meditation, especially for transcendental meditation; the picture is an image of Buddha as seen in a Los Angeles museum, which Lynch tells us emitted a ray of light while he observed it.

This is the wonderful and bizarre world of David Lynch, oscillating between light and shadow and its enthralling intermediate entities.

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In a memorable conversation celebrated in Paris, his second home, David Lynch invites us to go over 99 of his favourite photographs and treats us with his commentary. This practice, in which acclaimed personalities choose 99 images for a book compilation, was part of the 15th anniversary of Paris Photo, celebrated at the Grand Palais.

There are few choices better than David Lynch for this purpose. As is shown in the video, while observing an image, Lynch’s imagination is to the brim with richness. The film director can imagine whole stories from a single image, revealing a guide of sorts to what is surely his creative process when visualising a film: subtle signs, provocative gestures, what lies behind the walls, in the darkness or even the life behind a staring face.

Lynch never stops constructing narratives; even from the juxtaposed images for the Paris Photo Bank, he knits a cinematic sequence between them. He basks in joy with the descriptions: “I love organic phenomenon, the flesh, the play of light.”, he says while contemplating what appears to be a swollen limb. The film-maker, who has also designed a Parisian nightclub, shares his love for curtains: “because they hide things, this is the fascination with theatres, they open and close, revealing the world.”

The last image in the book shows us his fondness for meditation, especially for transcendental meditation; the picture is an image of Buddha as seen in a Los Angeles museum, which Lynch tells us emitted a ray of light while he observed it.

This is the wonderful and bizarre world of David Lynch, oscillating between light and shadow and its enthralling intermediate entities.

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