Architecture is born with the first stones or planks piled by man, set and united to secure shelter and happiness for himself. Back then, his constructions harmonized with the environment, the designs were fused with natural aesthetics and did not alter the course of rivers, nor did they pollute the environment. As larger numbers of people settled in certain places, this link became unsustainable. Personalizing spaces to fit mankind’s needs and gods became an ever-challenging activity, which grew and, in the process, distanced it from its natural sensitivity.

A profound approach to the primitive abode, and the consecutive development of architecture throughout history, is found in the work of imminent architectural historian Joseph Rykwert. On Adam’s House in Paradise (1972) analyzes treatises by relevant architects, and exposes ancient civilizations’ myths and legends ––delving deeply into the development of the first abode and the evolution of inhabitable space throughout time.

Many large cities have proved to be inefficient models, which do not guarantee the preservation of nature or health (mental, physical, etc.). Now, more than ever before, we must consider all options when it comes to erecting any building.  In the second half of the 20th century, extensive researches were carried out concerning the construction of environmentally friendly buildings, optimally designed to relate to man’s first home in the natural paradise which once was Earth. Among them, the most eminent have been the paths suggested by people like Buckminster Fuller, Bill Mollison, Luc Schuiten, and Jacque Fresco, among others.

In recent decades, highly resistant materials, whose production and degradation processes do not pollute, have been developed. In this sense, 3D printing is an exciting promise. With no raw material waste and astounding efficiency, in a not so distant future we could print sophisticated inhabitable spaces.

The will of contemporary creators must assume the challenge of linking the functionality of cities with the urgent needs of man and nature. This is the field of work for those interested in biomimicry, the science in charge of transferring structural aspects of nature’s design to function in human life. This has to be done in such a way that a building can purify water, generate a large part of its energy or be structured as a tree and distribute resources fairly.

It is important to rethink the methods and materials we currently use to build. But it is fundamental to reimagine the City; to abandon the perception of it being a cumulus of dead matter, organized for the sole purpose that a human group could inhabit it. In turn, we must honor urban centers as integrally living entities, adjustable and inserted in a large whole, which they share with other cities and with natural space which, as the blank space of a page, makes sense of our shared history.

Architecture is born with the first stones or planks piled by man, set and united to secure shelter and happiness for himself. Back then, his constructions harmonized with the environment, the designs were fused with natural aesthetics and did not alter the course of rivers, nor did they pollute the environment. As larger numbers of people settled in certain places, this link became unsustainable. Personalizing spaces to fit mankind’s needs and gods became an ever-challenging activity, which grew and, in the process, distanced it from its natural sensitivity.

A profound approach to the primitive abode, and the consecutive development of architecture throughout history, is found in the work of imminent architectural historian Joseph Rykwert. On Adam’s House in Paradise (1972) analyzes treatises by relevant architects, and exposes ancient civilizations’ myths and legends ––delving deeply into the development of the first abode and the evolution of inhabitable space throughout time.

Many large cities have proved to be inefficient models, which do not guarantee the preservation of nature or health (mental, physical, etc.). Now, more than ever before, we must consider all options when it comes to erecting any building.  In the second half of the 20th century, extensive researches were carried out concerning the construction of environmentally friendly buildings, optimally designed to relate to man’s first home in the natural paradise which once was Earth. Among them, the most eminent have been the paths suggested by people like Buckminster Fuller, Bill Mollison, Luc Schuiten, and Jacque Fresco, among others.

In recent decades, highly resistant materials, whose production and degradation processes do not pollute, have been developed. In this sense, 3D printing is an exciting promise. With no raw material waste and astounding efficiency, in a not so distant future we could print sophisticated inhabitable spaces.

The will of contemporary creators must assume the challenge of linking the functionality of cities with the urgent needs of man and nature. This is the field of work for those interested in biomimicry, the science in charge of transferring structural aspects of nature’s design to function in human life. This has to be done in such a way that a building can purify water, generate a large part of its energy or be structured as a tree and distribute resources fairly.

It is important to rethink the methods and materials we currently use to build. But it is fundamental to reimagine the City; to abandon the perception of it being a cumulus of dead matter, organized for the sole purpose that a human group could inhabit it. In turn, we must honor urban centers as integrally living entities, adjustable and inserted in a large whole, which they share with other cities and with natural space which, as the blank space of a page, makes sense of our shared history.

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