One of the essential characteristics of living in this era is that we can visit all sorts of places from the comfort of our home, sitting in our pajamas if we so wish. For the world of writers, this presents a pleasurable luxury, and one which we can take an even greater advantage of. We can order books online and have them sent to our local bookstore if they don’t have them there; we can share parts of our library with users who share a similar frame of mind; upload our texts and get feedback from other writers; publish our work; and we can even, talk to our favorite authors about our favorite books.

Melissa Chadburn, a renowned freelance writer who devotes part of her life to curating the best websites on the Net, has been kind enough to make a virtual catalogue of websites that can enrich our interaction with the literary world. In Ask a Freelancer, Chadburn answers a few questions surrounding writing, the blogosphere, and the construction of platforms and, the horror of the self-publishing world.

“There are basically two different categories of sites” she points out, “those that feature lyrical essays and books reviews and novel excerpts as well as some of their own original content, and those literary sites that are more interactive that writers might find useful in terms of getting feedback or engaging directly with other writers.”

Melissa goes on to make one of the best lists that encompass social sites for writers, where we can find some incredible finds:

Fitionaut: this website gathers the best fictional writing social networks, connecting readers and writers in a community network that features the best short stories, poems, instant fiction and early extracts. For now they’re still in a phase of “by invitation only”, but you can register here to ask for one. Through this portal you can upload your short works and obtain comments from other uses or even publish your work in one of the magazines that participate in the site. “It’s kind of like Facebook meets a literary submission site, and it’s really neat” she points out.

Red Lemonade: this website works in a similar manner to fictionaut in the sense that you can upload your work and get feedback; but Red lemonade focuses on a longer format, novels. This space also features and editorial project: if your project gets enough online buzz, you have the opportunity of publishing your work.

AccountabiliBuddy: is currently undergoing its conceptual phase, since it doesn’t have enough users yet. It main feature allows you to upload your writing goals so that other users can check your progress and vice versa. This is an ideal tool for procrastinators that tend to put aside their writing on a daily basis. The network of users helps individuals complete the goal they set for themselves at the beginning of the week.

Goodreads: this platform allows you to review books and to send books to other users, this enables you to share your top reads and to initiate conversation with some of the authors. Other readers can benefit from favourable reviews of books floating around on the new. The website was recently bought by Amazon, and while their independent publishing house has been moved it remains a great literary space.

Indiebound: this space allows you to find independent bookstores close to your home, and if they don’t have the book you’re looking for, you can order them online and have them sent there.

Electric Literature: although this is not an interactive website, they publish a trimestral journal in an e-book or hardcover format. They also publish short stories and make fabulous animations for simple sentences in every single one of their works.

.

One of the essential characteristics of living in this era is that we can visit all sorts of places from the comfort of our home, sitting in our pajamas if we so wish. For the world of writers, this presents a pleasurable luxury, and one which we can take an even greater advantage of. We can order books online and have them sent to our local bookstore if they don’t have them there; we can share parts of our library with users who share a similar frame of mind; upload our texts and get feedback from other writers; publish our work; and we can even, talk to our favorite authors about our favorite books.

Melissa Chadburn, a renowned freelance writer who devotes part of her life to curating the best websites on the Net, has been kind enough to make a virtual catalogue of websites that can enrich our interaction with the literary world. In Ask a Freelancer, Chadburn answers a few questions surrounding writing, the blogosphere, and the construction of platforms and, the horror of the self-publishing world.

“There are basically two different categories of sites” she points out, “those that feature lyrical essays and books reviews and novel excerpts as well as some of their own original content, and those literary sites that are more interactive that writers might find useful in terms of getting feedback or engaging directly with other writers.”

Melissa goes on to make one of the best lists that encompass social sites for writers, where we can find some incredible finds:

Fitionaut: this website gathers the best fictional writing social networks, connecting readers and writers in a community network that features the best short stories, poems, instant fiction and early extracts. For now they’re still in a phase of “by invitation only”, but you can register here to ask for one. Through this portal you can upload your short works and obtain comments from other uses or even publish your work in one of the magazines that participate in the site. “It’s kind of like Facebook meets a literary submission site, and it’s really neat” she points out.

Red Lemonade: this website works in a similar manner to fictionaut in the sense that you can upload your work and get feedback; but Red lemonade focuses on a longer format, novels. This space also features and editorial project: if your project gets enough online buzz, you have the opportunity of publishing your work.

AccountabiliBuddy: is currently undergoing its conceptual phase, since it doesn’t have enough users yet. It main feature allows you to upload your writing goals so that other users can check your progress and vice versa. This is an ideal tool for procrastinators that tend to put aside their writing on a daily basis. The network of users helps individuals complete the goal they set for themselves at the beginning of the week.

Goodreads: this platform allows you to review books and to send books to other users, this enables you to share your top reads and to initiate conversation with some of the authors. Other readers can benefit from favourable reviews of books floating around on the new. The website was recently bought by Amazon, and while their independent publishing house has been moved it remains a great literary space.

Indiebound: this space allows you to find independent bookstores close to your home, and if they don’t have the book you’re looking for, you can order them online and have them sent there.

Electric Literature: although this is not an interactive website, they publish a trimestral journal in an e-book or hardcover format. They also publish short stories and make fabulous animations for simple sentences in every single one of their works.

.

Tagged: , , ,