Traditionally, creativity has been associated with inspiration, which is a stimulus that commonly encourages us to create something. Is it possible then, that it be an inherent state of creativity? If the answer were positive, anyone who was interested in practising it would privilege an exhaustive persecution of inspiration. However, the state of inspiration, beyond being found, could perhaps develop from something more pragmatic and simple: an attitude of cognitive openness.

If creation comes from stimulating ideas or feelings, then the world unfolds into infinite possibilities which can be transformed into inspiration through an open mind. The creative cliché, generally accompanied by “practices” that do not necessarily inspire your mind –– such as living in a beautiful place, carrying a notebook anywhere you go, or leaving the negative global news aside –– should be discarded.

The key to develop creativity could possibly be finding its true or authentic attribute in practically any experience, person or landscape. The exercise would thus revolves around keeping a curious attitude, permeated by a continuous sense of admiration before everything that happens .

Some example of this are:

1. A supermarket employee’s negative attitude could inspire you to develop a novel based on the possible story of his life.

2. “Bad” news, such as the fall of your country’s stock market, could be an invitation to imagine possible economic alternatives for your community or your family.

3. Your baby’s stinky feet could end up inspiring a memorable melody.

4. Upon leaving your house you realize its cloudy, but the deep blue palette of the scene generates an uncontrollable desire to paint a sheet of paper entirely of blue.

We lack formulas to develop a creative mind, but perhaps the only thing inspiration requires is for us to understand the simplicity of the state. At the end of the day, when all is said and done, the most stimulating ideas could come from the most quotidian and apparently insignificant experiences. The magic of the micro.

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Traditionally, creativity has been associated with inspiration, which is a stimulus that commonly encourages us to create something. Is it possible then, that it be an inherent state of creativity? If the answer were positive, anyone who was interested in practising it would privilege an exhaustive persecution of inspiration. However, the state of inspiration, beyond being found, could perhaps develop from something more pragmatic and simple: an attitude of cognitive openness.

If creation comes from stimulating ideas or feelings, then the world unfolds into infinite possibilities which can be transformed into inspiration through an open mind. The creative cliché, generally accompanied by “practices” that do not necessarily inspire your mind –– such as living in a beautiful place, carrying a notebook anywhere you go, or leaving the negative global news aside –– should be discarded.

The key to develop creativity could possibly be finding its true or authentic attribute in practically any experience, person or landscape. The exercise would thus revolves around keeping a curious attitude, permeated by a continuous sense of admiration before everything that happens .

Some example of this are:

1. A supermarket employee’s negative attitude could inspire you to develop a novel based on the possible story of his life.

2. “Bad” news, such as the fall of your country’s stock market, could be an invitation to imagine possible economic alternatives for your community or your family.

3. Your baby’s stinky feet could end up inspiring a memorable melody.

4. Upon leaving your house you realize its cloudy, but the deep blue palette of the scene generates an uncontrollable desire to paint a sheet of paper entirely of blue.

We lack formulas to develop a creative mind, but perhaps the only thing inspiration requires is for us to understand the simplicity of the state. At the end of the day, when all is said and done, the most stimulating ideas could come from the most quotidian and apparently insignificant experiences. The magic of the micro.

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