Susanne Jaschko was curator of the 2011 Pixalache festival in Helsinki where participants discussed the current reach of information mapping, when she decided to post a text on her blog about how personal information is used by banks, governments, and telephone companies, and their lack of transparency when it comes to their use confidential data.

Jaschko is concerned by the use and abuse of personal information by third parties. She also believes that information should serve the public wellbeing; we should make it our own, taking it to other spaces, other than the common ones where we usually introduce it, for example, infographics.

The result of Jaschko’s problematic was the alliance with Moritz Stefaner to create the Open Data Cooking Workshop, founded with the intention of transfering population information in lentils or the suicide rate of a city in a cocktail.

The basic idea is to represent data in a completely new way. In Stefaner’s workshops participants are asked to choose and develop a theme, later questioning if they really committed to it when they created their dish, whether each ingredient was in accordance with the visual principles they wanted to achieve from the start.

The Open Data Cooking Workshop isn’t the first of its kind. In London, The Art Hack group had previously challenged hundreds of artists to create anything they wanted using public data.

Concretely, these types of creative workshops are meant to empower the people in a tangible and edible ways to take back public information and to experiment with the risks and rewards of the age of information in playfully subversive ways. If data is public property, it is susceptible to being transformed by anyone. Once again, imagination knows no bounds.

Susanne Jaschko was curator of the 2011 Pixalache festival in Helsinki where participants discussed the current reach of information mapping, when she decided to post a text on her blog about how personal information is used by banks, governments, and telephone companies, and their lack of transparency when it comes to their use confidential data.

Jaschko is concerned by the use and abuse of personal information by third parties. She also believes that information should serve the public wellbeing; we should make it our own, taking it to other spaces, other than the common ones where we usually introduce it, for example, infographics.

The result of Jaschko’s problematic was the alliance with Moritz Stefaner to create the Open Data Cooking Workshop, founded with the intention of transfering population information in lentils or the suicide rate of a city in a cocktail.

The basic idea is to represent data in a completely new way. In Stefaner’s workshops participants are asked to choose and develop a theme, later questioning if they really committed to it when they created their dish, whether each ingredient was in accordance with the visual principles they wanted to achieve from the start.

The Open Data Cooking Workshop isn’t the first of its kind. In London, The Art Hack group had previously challenged hundreds of artists to create anything they wanted using public data.

Concretely, these types of creative workshops are meant to empower the people in a tangible and edible ways to take back public information and to experiment with the risks and rewards of the age of information in playfully subversive ways. If data is public property, it is susceptible to being transformed by anyone. Once again, imagination knows no bounds.

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