Emoji work as an extension of the expressive capacity within the brief conversations that make up our digital day-to-day lives. Their faces become ours, or at least, they express our emotions and moods to such a degree that they’ve become rather like new punctuation marks.

Thinking of emoji outside the scope of messenger communications may seem like a gratuitous eccentricity or a (new) advance toward the dissolution of the limits between the “real” world and the virtual one.

Dutch architect, Changiz Tehrani, added emojis to the facade of a new apartment building in Utrecht, Netherlands, to the admiration of some and to the discomfort of others. The building, located in a residential area, is not particularly striking for anything other than for the characteristic features of smiling, sad, confused, audacious and melancholic faces that constitute the emotional range of emoji.

emojis
The firm Millro was commissioned to make the 22 emojis, in the manner of medieval gargoyles, and to reflect the spirit of the time when the building was built. “Because the building is very strong, even severe, we wanted some funniness to lighten it up,” Tehrani said in an interview, noting that the emoji “are really strong, recognizable shapes.” Detractors of the peculiar gesture have, however, opined that the building will more swiftly become dated.

“Architecture is serious,” according to Sean Khorsandi, professor of theory and history of architecture at the New York Institute of Technology. For him, the use and selection of materials implies a responsibility. “If everything is a joke (…) that’s a dangerous attitude to have,” and a kind of negligence is incurred.

Funny gesture or bad joke, the building with the emoji facade is giving people something to talk about, and the poles of the discussion don’t seem allow for much common ground between them. Tehrani states that “Architecture is not a religion for us, you also have to have fun.” The debate is perhaps best symbolically represented with the immutable gesture of the smiley face, or the one with dark glasses, perhaps captioned with the phrase, “Deal with it.”

emojis

*Images: video – United News International

Emoji work as an extension of the expressive capacity within the brief conversations that make up our digital day-to-day lives. Their faces become ours, or at least, they express our emotions and moods to such a degree that they’ve become rather like new punctuation marks.

Thinking of emoji outside the scope of messenger communications may seem like a gratuitous eccentricity or a (new) advance toward the dissolution of the limits between the “real” world and the virtual one.

Dutch architect, Changiz Tehrani, added emojis to the facade of a new apartment building in Utrecht, Netherlands, to the admiration of some and to the discomfort of others. The building, located in a residential area, is not particularly striking for anything other than for the characteristic features of smiling, sad, confused, audacious and melancholic faces that constitute the emotional range of emoji.

emojis
The firm Millro was commissioned to make the 22 emojis, in the manner of medieval gargoyles, and to reflect the spirit of the time when the building was built. “Because the building is very strong, even severe, we wanted some funniness to lighten it up,” Tehrani said in an interview, noting that the emoji “are really strong, recognizable shapes.” Detractors of the peculiar gesture have, however, opined that the building will more swiftly become dated.

“Architecture is serious,” according to Sean Khorsandi, professor of theory and history of architecture at the New York Institute of Technology. For him, the use and selection of materials implies a responsibility. “If everything is a joke (…) that’s a dangerous attitude to have,” and a kind of negligence is incurred.

Funny gesture or bad joke, the building with the emoji facade is giving people something to talk about, and the poles of the discussion don’t seem allow for much common ground between them. Tehrani states that “Architecture is not a religion for us, you also have to have fun.” The debate is perhaps best symbolically represented with the immutable gesture of the smiley face, or the one with dark glasses, perhaps captioned with the phrase, “Deal with it.”

emojis

*Images: video – United News International