The types of advice can vary from practical systems to esoteric and spiritual, and are attributable to “learning to live” somehow. But of the existing advice, and the taboo that envelopes them (because they lean towards being patronizing or pretentious), those passed down by our grandmothers are of a completely different kind.

Systematically, grandmothers consult unwritten encyclopedias which condense millenary wisdom: a series of “well known truths” that they take everywhere they go. But the main ingredient of their suggestions is a disinterested love; they genuinely want to make life easier for you. Nobody who loves us as much as they do would give us a piece of advice that has not been empirically proven and that is not —at least in theory— a way to “save” us some trouble.

This combination of sayings, beliefs and superstitions come from an era when common sense and value systems had to be much more acute than they are today. People were not bombarded by consumerism, chemicals or the frenetic rhythm of the digital age. ––They had to solve problems with the things they had at hand and with the advice their parents and grandparents had passed down to them.

Douglas Adams, author of The Hitchhikers’ Guide to the Galaxy (1978), said that the quality of advice offered by someone must be judged in contrast to the life they actually led. The women that came before us knew something we do not.

Here are some grandmotherly advice to make life a little more simple and honest:

Do not try to solve serious problems in the middle of the night.

Be honorable, always.

Eat carbonized foods for tummy aches.

Place lavender on your pillow to sleep better.

For joint pain apply cannabis oil and rub over the sore area.

Take good care of your clothes; if necessary, mend them.

Change the soles of your shoes every two years.

Use your things until they’re last breath.

To stay in shape rub ice on your body after you take a shower.

Don’t believe your eggs’ expiration date: place them in a large bowl of water: if they sink, they’re still fresh; if they float, throw them away.

Line your fridge’s vegetable drawer with paper napkins. They absorb the excess humidity which can make them rot.

Clean your windows with newspaper.

Save some money for a rainy day.

In order to be respectable, you must be brave.

The types of advice can vary from practical systems to esoteric and spiritual, and are attributable to “learning to live” somehow. But of the existing advice, and the taboo that envelopes them (because they lean towards being patronizing or pretentious), those passed down by our grandmothers are of a completely different kind.

Systematically, grandmothers consult unwritten encyclopedias which condense millenary wisdom: a series of “well known truths” that they take everywhere they go. But the main ingredient of their suggestions is a disinterested love; they genuinely want to make life easier for you. Nobody who loves us as much as they do would give us a piece of advice that has not been empirically proven and that is not —at least in theory— a way to “save” us some trouble.

This combination of sayings, beliefs and superstitions come from an era when common sense and value systems had to be much more acute than they are today. People were not bombarded by consumerism, chemicals or the frenetic rhythm of the digital age. ––They had to solve problems with the things they had at hand and with the advice their parents and grandparents had passed down to them.

Douglas Adams, author of The Hitchhikers’ Guide to the Galaxy (1978), said that the quality of advice offered by someone must be judged in contrast to the life they actually led. The women that came before us knew something we do not.

Here are some grandmotherly advice to make life a little more simple and honest:

Do not try to solve serious problems in the middle of the night.

Be honorable, always.

Eat carbonized foods for tummy aches.

Place lavender on your pillow to sleep better.

For joint pain apply cannabis oil and rub over the sore area.

Take good care of your clothes; if necessary, mend them.

Change the soles of your shoes every two years.

Use your things until they’re last breath.

To stay in shape rub ice on your body after you take a shower.

Don’t believe your eggs’ expiration date: place them in a large bowl of water: if they sink, they’re still fresh; if they float, throw them away.

Line your fridge’s vegetable drawer with paper napkins. They absorb the excess humidity which can make them rot.

Clean your windows with newspaper.

Save some money for a rainy day.

In order to be respectable, you must be brave.

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