Color is one of the most intriguing ingredients of reality. Its nature is in essence paradoxical. On one hand, it evidently permeates existence as one of the most striking qualities of matter. On the other hand, it is completely relative and there are even those who condemn it to nonexistence. In fact, strictly speaking, color is a property of light and not of matter.

Taking the above into account, one could consider color a rare jewel of perceptible reality, on the premise that it intensifies to the extent that we are plunged into the most eccentric regions of the color palette.

Harvard2

Within Harvard University, a place called the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies houses a grand collection of pigments, including many of the world’s most extravagant colors. This radiant archive was created from the Forbes Collection of Pigments, collected over three decades by one Edward Forbes who was considered a pioneer in developing the protocols for the conservation of artistic works. The collection has since been added to with pigments not yet in existence during Forbes’ time and crowning, primarily, the iridescent range of colors.

Pigment Collection Pigment Collection

Imagine thousands of glass jars containing each respective pigment, safeguarded, meticulously sorted and treasured as strange dialogues between light and matter. The collection could be considered the most comprehensive color palette ever compiled by humankind. Here we can witness a meeting of purple “mauve,” whose tone results from the secretion of the marine snail, bolinus brandaris and deep “ultramarine blue” which synthetically replicates the tone of Lapis lazuli (previously obtained by grinding Egyptian mummies, and considered a rarity even in the 18th century).

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Color is one of the most intriguing ingredients of reality. Its nature is in essence paradoxical. On one hand, it evidently permeates existence as one of the most striking qualities of matter. On the other hand, it is completely relative and there are even those who condemn it to nonexistence. In fact, strictly speaking, color is a property of light and not of matter.

Taking the above into account, one could consider color a rare jewel of perceptible reality, on the premise that it intensifies to the extent that we are plunged into the most eccentric regions of the color palette.

Harvard2

Within Harvard University, a place called the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies houses a grand collection of pigments, including many of the world’s most extravagant colors. This radiant archive was created from the Forbes Collection of Pigments, collected over three decades by one Edward Forbes who was considered a pioneer in developing the protocols for the conservation of artistic works. The collection has since been added to with pigments not yet in existence during Forbes’ time and crowning, primarily, the iridescent range of colors.

Pigment Collection Pigment Collection

Imagine thousands of glass jars containing each respective pigment, safeguarded, meticulously sorted and treasured as strange dialogues between light and matter. The collection could be considered the most comprehensive color palette ever compiled by humankind. Here we can witness a meeting of purple “mauve,” whose tone results from the secretion of the marine snail, bolinus brandaris and deep “ultramarine blue” which synthetically replicates the tone of Lapis lazuli (previously obtained by grinding Egyptian mummies, and considered a rarity even in the 18th century).

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