For the listening pleasure of bird-lovers and ornithologists alike, the Macaulay Library collected 7,513 hours of bird songs, which represent around 9,000 different species. Among the most stunning songs is one by a North American caribou, a type of large owl that sings with a peculiar obscurantism which would be largely unknown for the human species were it not for this effort to make it available through software.

Although the collection also includes songs from other animals such as whales, the true focus is on birds. Cornell recommends the following:

The oldest recording: On a spring day this song was heard, it belonged to melodic sparrow.

The perkiest wake-up call: A dawn choir from Queensland, Australia.

Closest resemblance to an alien landing: Birds of Paradise making unbelievable sounds.

Professional naturists and amateurs can make the most of this archive which helps imagine, visualise, feel and analyse animal songs using the free version of the sound-analysing software called Raven. After all, speaking, singing, whistling or squawking is a always and essentially a form of communication.

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For the listening pleasure of bird-lovers and ornithologists alike, the Macaulay Library collected 7,513 hours of bird songs, which represent around 9,000 different species. Among the most stunning songs is one by a North American caribou, a type of large owl that sings with a peculiar obscurantism which would be largely unknown for the human species were it not for this effort to make it available through software.

Although the collection also includes songs from other animals such as whales, the true focus is on birds. Cornell recommends the following:

The oldest recording: On a spring day this song was heard, it belonged to melodic sparrow.

The perkiest wake-up call: A dawn choir from Queensland, Australia.

Closest resemblance to an alien landing: Birds of Paradise making unbelievable sounds.

Professional naturists and amateurs can make the most of this archive which helps imagine, visualise, feel and analyse animal songs using the free version of the sound-analysing software called Raven. After all, speaking, singing, whistling or squawking is a always and essentially a form of communication.

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