Reminiscent of 18th century Romantic revelations is Philippe Safire’s (France, 1981) conviction that Nature is the true source of all eternal wisdom, a sacred realm from which the powers of divinity speak truths into the souls of those who remain attentive to its perpetual motions.

In the artist’s own words, “it is difficult to perceive this divinity with the human brain because, in this digital age, we live in a society of spectacle, detached from the natural world.” Safire’s divinity is that same power manifest in David Caspar Friedrich and J. M. W. Turner’s landscape paintings, and in the yearning voices of John Keats and Novalis. Safire echoes their need for communing with divine nature as actualized on Earth in the inner landscapes of the human mind.

Safire’s multimedia installations project hallucinatory images onto impossible plexiglas surfaces, with mesmerizing precision and beauty. Walking through Safire’s installations under digital hypnosis, one begins to reflect upon the content of the projections and commune with the artist’s intuitions. In his own words, “we imagine truths that are disconnected from reality. Our consumer society is harmful to the world around us.”

The modest, avant-garde layout of Safire’s installations allows viewers to immerse themselves directly in a science fiction atmosphere. Interacting with the pieces, one is left wondering how these machines work and what lies behind these enchanting digital artworks.

The Romantic rebelliousness Kenneth Clark recognized in the artistic temperament of the 18th century is a rebellion against what artists perceived as the imminent distortion of human nature by the growing economic apparatus. This sentiment, manifest in the great artworks of the Romantics, attests to the destruction of the world as they knew it. Contemporary artists like Safire now echo this timeless concern. From digital media, Safire’s artistic protest rises against the corruption of the human spirit, a voice rebelling for what is left of the natural world.

Reminiscent of 18th century Romantic revelations is Philippe Safire’s (France, 1981) conviction that Nature is the true source of all eternal wisdom, a sacred realm from which the powers of divinity speak truths into the souls of those who remain attentive to its perpetual motions.

In the artist’s own words, “it is difficult to perceive this divinity with the human brain because, in this digital age, we live in a society of spectacle, detached from the natural world.” Safire’s divinity is that same power manifest in David Caspar Friedrich and J. M. W. Turner’s landscape paintings, and in the yearning voices of John Keats and Novalis. Safire echoes their need for communing with divine nature as actualized on Earth in the inner landscapes of the human mind.

Safire’s multimedia installations project hallucinatory images onto impossible plexiglas surfaces, with mesmerizing precision and beauty. Walking through Safire’s installations under digital hypnosis, one begins to reflect upon the content of the projections and commune with the artist’s intuitions. In his own words, “we imagine truths that are disconnected from reality. Our consumer society is harmful to the world around us.”

The modest, avant-garde layout of Safire’s installations allows viewers to immerse themselves directly in a science fiction atmosphere. Interacting with the pieces, one is left wondering how these machines work and what lies behind these enchanting digital artworks.

The Romantic rebelliousness Kenneth Clark recognized in the artistic temperament of the 18th century is a rebellion against what artists perceived as the imminent distortion of human nature by the growing economic apparatus. This sentiment, manifest in the great artworks of the Romantics, attests to the destruction of the world as they knew it. Contemporary artists like Safire now echo this timeless concern. From digital media, Safire’s artistic protest rises against the corruption of the human spirit, a voice rebelling for what is left of the natural world.

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