Since the discovery of fire, people have noticed that burning certain herbs produces an aromatic smoke. While savoring the smell, they also noticed they could cause subtle changes in the environment. That is, they noticed that the smoke of certain herbs, resins and dried flowers could purify the atmosphere and then improve the mood and alleviate some discomfort.

The ritual of burning of herbs has never disappeared from human culture. From the myrrh and frankincense of the Church and the bazaars of the Middle East to the Indian sandalwoods and the sages of the American and Mesoamerica Indians, this mode of purifying space is a global phenomenon. It’s a tool that has remained with us. After all, the sense of smell is the only one directly connected to emotions through the limbic lobe of the brain. It’s also the only sense that never sleeps.

In addition to the metaphorical and mystical understanding that smoke has in many traditions as a bridge between this world and another, and as an offering to the spirits, science has recently discovered that burning certain herbs, like sage, generates negative ions in the air. And we know how beneficial it is for us to be close to these ions. This could explain why so many human cultures, despite having no contact with one another, perfume sacred spaces with the same herbs.

Beyond these reasons, and coupled with the aroma that herbs emit, we could proceed to clean the very ether with them. This is done preferably in a space where we spend a lot of time or one that we perceive to be cloudy or stagnant. Before enlisting some of these most effective herbs for cleaning though, we recommend a brief procedure of respect.

Prior to smudging, one should open a window or a door, and place the herbs in a shell or a bowl made from organic material, and then light them with a wooden match. Gently blow on any flames to leave only glowing embers. Using the smoke that emerges, wash the hands metaphorically, and put a little on the eyes, ears, chest and head, while breathing just a whiff of the smoke.

Once this procedure is finished, the bowl can be set in a safe place and allowed to burn until the room is filled with smoke. You can also take a bouquet of the herbs and move it into corners and under furniture to reach the greatest possible space. A good way to dispose of the ashes is to blow them into nearby trees or your garden.

Following are five herbs, woods and resins good for purification and deep cleaning:

.

White sage:

306b35a2-24a3-4777-a820-029e12b6e082

The smoke of white sage is used to disperse not only inappropriate vibrations and evil spirits but also to “absorb” conflict, anger or disease in a person. In fact, this is one of the herbs that most alters the composition of the air to generate negative ions. The effect of these is to reduce our stress response.

.

Palo Santo:

Palo sto

The smoking splinters of the lignum tree, also called “sacred wood”, are used as a repellent effective against negative energies and work well as a trigger for vitality in the body.

.

Copal:

Copal

Copal is a sweet, spicy and woody resin that’s used for rituals and ceremonies like the “food of the gods” ceremony. The smoke is used as protection, body cleansing and for divination.

.

Lavender:

642x361_What_Lavender_Can_Do_for_You

Lavender smoke is the lightest smoke on this list, and so it’s great for providing balance. It not only gives off an enchanting aroma, but it can be used to lighten a space and to promote a peaceful and deep sleep.

.

Cedar:

cedar

Like sage, cedar disperses stagnant and negative energies and attracts positive influences. Its smoke purifies and cleanses while giving off a pleasant smell. It’s also believed to revive the spirit and to help with fatigue and listlessness.

.

Since the discovery of fire, people have noticed that burning certain herbs produces an aromatic smoke. While savoring the smell, they also noticed they could cause subtle changes in the environment. That is, they noticed that the smoke of certain herbs, resins and dried flowers could purify the atmosphere and then improve the mood and alleviate some discomfort.

The ritual of burning of herbs has never disappeared from human culture. From the myrrh and frankincense of the Church and the bazaars of the Middle East to the Indian sandalwoods and the sages of the American and Mesoamerica Indians, this mode of purifying space is a global phenomenon. It’s a tool that has remained with us. After all, the sense of smell is the only one directly connected to emotions through the limbic lobe of the brain. It’s also the only sense that never sleeps.

In addition to the metaphorical and mystical understanding that smoke has in many traditions as a bridge between this world and another, and as an offering to the spirits, science has recently discovered that burning certain herbs, like sage, generates negative ions in the air. And we know how beneficial it is for us to be close to these ions. This could explain why so many human cultures, despite having no contact with one another, perfume sacred spaces with the same herbs.

Beyond these reasons, and coupled with the aroma that herbs emit, we could proceed to clean the very ether with them. This is done preferably in a space where we spend a lot of time or one that we perceive to be cloudy or stagnant. Before enlisting some of these most effective herbs for cleaning though, we recommend a brief procedure of respect.

Prior to smudging, one should open a window or a door, and place the herbs in a shell or a bowl made from organic material, and then light them with a wooden match. Gently blow on any flames to leave only glowing embers. Using the smoke that emerges, wash the hands metaphorically, and put a little on the eyes, ears, chest and head, while breathing just a whiff of the smoke.

Once this procedure is finished, the bowl can be set in a safe place and allowed to burn until the room is filled with smoke. You can also take a bouquet of the herbs and move it into corners and under furniture to reach the greatest possible space. A good way to dispose of the ashes is to blow them into nearby trees or your garden.

Following are five herbs, woods and resins good for purification and deep cleaning:

.

White sage:

306b35a2-24a3-4777-a820-029e12b6e082

The smoke of white sage is used to disperse not only inappropriate vibrations and evil spirits but also to “absorb” conflict, anger or disease in a person. In fact, this is one of the herbs that most alters the composition of the air to generate negative ions. The effect of these is to reduce our stress response.

.

Palo Santo:

Palo sto

The smoking splinters of the lignum tree, also called “sacred wood”, are used as a repellent effective against negative energies and work well as a trigger for vitality in the body.

.

Copal:

Copal

Copal is a sweet, spicy and woody resin that’s used for rituals and ceremonies like the “food of the gods” ceremony. The smoke is used as protection, body cleansing and for divination.

.

Lavender:

642x361_What_Lavender_Can_Do_for_You

Lavender smoke is the lightest smoke on this list, and so it’s great for providing balance. It not only gives off an enchanting aroma, but it can be used to lighten a space and to promote a peaceful and deep sleep.

.

Cedar:

cedar

Like sage, cedar disperses stagnant and negative energies and attracts positive influences. Its smoke purifies and cleanses while giving off a pleasant smell. It’s also believed to revive the spirit and to help with fatigue and listlessness.

.

Tagged: , , , , , , ,