For centuries high schools, colleges and universities taught sets of intertwined knowledge. Such was the case with the medieval Trivium (grammar, rhetoric and logic) and the accompanying Quadrivium (arithmetic, geometry, music and astronomy). Through the relationships between math and music, between logic and rhetoric, we learn that science and art have come a long way in education, and they’ve done so hand in hand.

Instead, current education systems, many of them, don’t focus on the development of skills and innate talents of the student, nor in finding and promoting a genuine vocation. It seems that the premise is to dilute individual characteristics, in order to produce subjects exploitable in terms of production: the produce fuel, but never the operators of the large machines.

The teaching of philosophy and the arts at secondary and advanced levels of higher education is disappearing. Short sprints of technical education, to respond to the educational market demands, provide for professions with more job opportunities, and simply adapted to engage.

It’s more evident than ever that not enough skilled workers are produced for positions in companies and production centers. The formative roles of character, values, personalities and community education that were promoted for millennia have been undermined and reduced to their simplest version, “training.”

According to the linguist Noam Chomsky, the purpose of education is simply to “help people to learn to think for themselves.” Austrian thinker, Ivan Illich didn’t even believe that education depended on a school system. Illich advocated a deschooling of society in which the self-taught sought each other out to teach and to learn communally, and in a sense anticipating the internet forums of today. Leading British occultist, Aleister Crowley warned of the need for each individual from childhood, to create him or herself:

Let children educate themselves to be themselves. Those who train them to standards maim and deform them. Alien ideals impose parasitic perversions. Every child is a sphinx; none knoweth its secret but itself.

The disappearance of the teaching of philosophy and art in schools is a sad trend, but it can’t be the end of thought. As in times of darkness and intolerance (such as the fall of the Western Roman Empire, or the persecution of witches, heretics and scientists in Europe and in the colonies of the Americas), knowledge is held in networks. It transforms and is kept alive through the rebels who insist on staying untamed, and thinking. Long may they live!

 

*Image: Creative Commons

For centuries high schools, colleges and universities taught sets of intertwined knowledge. Such was the case with the medieval Trivium (grammar, rhetoric and logic) and the accompanying Quadrivium (arithmetic, geometry, music and astronomy). Through the relationships between math and music, between logic and rhetoric, we learn that science and art have come a long way in education, and they’ve done so hand in hand.

Instead, current education systems, many of them, don’t focus on the development of skills and innate talents of the student, nor in finding and promoting a genuine vocation. It seems that the premise is to dilute individual characteristics, in order to produce subjects exploitable in terms of production: the produce fuel, but never the operators of the large machines.

The teaching of philosophy and the arts at secondary and advanced levels of higher education is disappearing. Short sprints of technical education, to respond to the educational market demands, provide for professions with more job opportunities, and simply adapted to engage.

It’s more evident than ever that not enough skilled workers are produced for positions in companies and production centers. The formative roles of character, values, personalities and community education that were promoted for millennia have been undermined and reduced to their simplest version, “training.”

According to the linguist Noam Chomsky, the purpose of education is simply to “help people to learn to think for themselves.” Austrian thinker, Ivan Illich didn’t even believe that education depended on a school system. Illich advocated a deschooling of society in which the self-taught sought each other out to teach and to learn communally, and in a sense anticipating the internet forums of today. Leading British occultist, Aleister Crowley warned of the need for each individual from childhood, to create him or herself:

Let children educate themselves to be themselves. Those who train them to standards maim and deform them. Alien ideals impose parasitic perversions. Every child is a sphinx; none knoweth its secret but itself.

The disappearance of the teaching of philosophy and art in schools is a sad trend, but it can’t be the end of thought. As in times of darkness and intolerance (such as the fall of the Western Roman Empire, or the persecution of witches, heretics and scientists in Europe and in the colonies of the Americas), knowledge is held in networks. It transforms and is kept alive through the rebels who insist on staying untamed, and thinking. Long may they live!

 

*Image: Creative Commons

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