Waves are water and sea, they are symbol and pure force. Their forms and patterns have inspired humankind since ancient times, and they’ve invited lots of possible ways to approach them. At times they’re mounted. Sometimes waves are measured or classified, and sometimes they’re simply drawn. One character who preferred to reproduce them in tribute was Mori Yuzan. An artist of whose life but few details are known, he created some of the strangest and most beautiful celebrations of waves.

Of Yuzan, it’s only known that he came from Kyoto and that he died in 1917. We can deduce that he was a magnificent exponent of nihonga, a traditional Japanese artistic style that relied on specific techniques and materials. In 1903, he completed a work divided into three volumes inspired by the aesthetic patterns of waves. It was called Hamonshu and the books are believed to have been intended as manuals and graphic references for artisans looking to decorate objects with waves and wave patterns.

Yuzan’s designs have appeared on objects like swords, religious works, and in the classic Japanese miniature sculptures known as netsuke. Today, the graphic trilogy he created survives as a monochromatic eccentricity, and one in which an entirely original, flexible geometry lives on.

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Image: Public domain

Waves are water and sea, they are symbol and pure force. Their forms and patterns have inspired humankind since ancient times, and they’ve invited lots of possible ways to approach them. At times they’re mounted. Sometimes waves are measured or classified, and sometimes they’re simply drawn. One character who preferred to reproduce them in tribute was Mori Yuzan. An artist of whose life but few details are known, he created some of the strangest and most beautiful celebrations of waves.

Of Yuzan, it’s only known that he came from Kyoto and that he died in 1917. We can deduce that he was a magnificent exponent of nihonga, a traditional Japanese artistic style that relied on specific techniques and materials. In 1903, he completed a work divided into three volumes inspired by the aesthetic patterns of waves. It was called Hamonshu and the books are believed to have been intended as manuals and graphic references for artisans looking to decorate objects with waves and wave patterns.

Yuzan’s designs have appeared on objects like swords, religious works, and in the classic Japanese miniature sculptures known as netsuke. Today, the graphic trilogy he created survives as a monochromatic eccentricity, and one in which an entirely original, flexible geometry lives on.

>olas1
olas2
olas3
olas4
olas5
olas6
olas7
olas8
olas9
olas10

Image: Public domain