It’s impossible to see and sometimes we forget to feel it. Wind blows, caresses, whispers, travels, roars, and sometimes whips. But it is its invisible quality (one which mimics an unreality) that makes photographing it a true feat. Making a portrait of the wind is virtually impossible, but photographer Rachel Cobb managed to capture it in a brilliant collection of images titled Mistrala personal project that occupied her for 20 years.

Throughout human history, we’ve developed a brotherhood with the wind: we sail, generate energy, fly, and communicate with its help. Wind is mysterious in that we feel it, we hear it, and we can even smell it, but we never see it. But this is one photographer’s homage to it.

For Cobb, the best way to capture the un-capturable was to portray the wind’s effect on everyday life objects: things, people, the skies, fabrics, animals. Through the eyes of the artist, one can see how the wind rakes the mane of a horse, how people try to walk in the open despite a gale, the shapes and folds of a bride’s veil outside a church, the hair of someone troubled by the wind. Cobb’s feat is a combination of patience, skill, and a true understanding of the wind. Only in this way did she manage to reveal an invisible phenomenon.

The name of the collection comes from the name of the north wind that blows from European land to the Mediterranean Sea. Cold, dry and violent, the phenomenon doesn’t have a decipherable pattern or rhythm. Having lived in Lyon for many years, touched by this movement of air, the artist took the necessary inspiration. After two decades, the project has been realized in two ways, as an exhibition and as a publishing project – both under the same name: Mistral: The Legendary Wind of Provence.

Art (like the wind) has the sublime ability to affect us invisibly, to change the way we see and feel: after the wind (and after art) nothing is quite the same. Rachel Cobb’s photographic work is an opportunity to notice that which surrounds us all the time and that which is profoundly powerful. It’s a work of visual translation that required a special sensitivity and years, many years, of observation. Movement, mass, air, and atmospheric pressure: on seeing her photographs, one can almost feel the wind.

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Images: Rachel Cobb

It’s impossible to see and sometimes we forget to feel it. Wind blows, caresses, whispers, travels, roars, and sometimes whips. But it is its invisible quality (one which mimics an unreality) that makes photographing it a true feat. Making a portrait of the wind is virtually impossible, but photographer Rachel Cobb managed to capture it in a brilliant collection of images titled Mistrala personal project that occupied her for 20 years.

Throughout human history, we’ve developed a brotherhood with the wind: we sail, generate energy, fly, and communicate with its help. Wind is mysterious in that we feel it, we hear it, and we can even smell it, but we never see it. But this is one photographer’s homage to it.

For Cobb, the best way to capture the un-capturable was to portray the wind’s effect on everyday life objects: things, people, the skies, fabrics, animals. Through the eyes of the artist, one can see how the wind rakes the mane of a horse, how people try to walk in the open despite a gale, the shapes and folds of a bride’s veil outside a church, the hair of someone troubled by the wind. Cobb’s feat is a combination of patience, skill, and a true understanding of the wind. Only in this way did she manage to reveal an invisible phenomenon.

The name of the collection comes from the name of the north wind that blows from European land to the Mediterranean Sea. Cold, dry and violent, the phenomenon doesn’t have a decipherable pattern or rhythm. Having lived in Lyon for many years, touched by this movement of air, the artist took the necessary inspiration. After two decades, the project has been realized in two ways, as an exhibition and as a publishing project – both under the same name: Mistral: The Legendary Wind of Provence.

Art (like the wind) has the sublime ability to affect us invisibly, to change the way we see and feel: after the wind (and after art) nothing is quite the same. Rachel Cobb’s photographic work is an opportunity to notice that which surrounds us all the time and that which is profoundly powerful. It’s a work of visual translation that required a special sensitivity and years, many years, of observation. Movement, mass, air, and atmospheric pressure: on seeing her photographs, one can almost feel the wind.

>cobb1

cobb2

cobb3

cobb4

cobb5

cobb6

cobb7

cobb8

cobb9

 

cobb10

 

cobb11

cobb12

 

 

 

Images: Rachel Cobb