The relationship between words and images is so close that it is hard to imagine one without the other. They exist together, nourishing and enhancing each other; between the two of them they open up new possibilities in an infinite chain of meanings in which an image is much more than just an image, and each word speaks beyond itself.

A tangible example of this abstraction is the project Fotohistorias, a collective online album to which users can upload short stories of up to 150 words with photographs to help tell the tale.

Modern storytellers, in the tradition of the hakawati, hark back to One Thousand and One Nights, The Decameron and The Canterbury Tales from contemporary scenarios as familiar as catching up with friends or lovers and gossiping with coworkers. New technologies bring a novel approach to this ancient, most human of artforms, the activity that distinguishes and consolidates culture: storytelling.

Fotohistorias is an initiative of Costa Rican web designer Diego Barracuda, who also develops alternative content on his blog, Nistua, and other websites.

The relationship between words and images is so close that it is hard to imagine one without the other. They exist together, nourishing and enhancing each other; between the two of them they open up new possibilities in an infinite chain of meanings in which an image is much more than just an image, and each word speaks beyond itself.

A tangible example of this abstraction is the project Fotohistorias, a collective online album to which users can upload short stories of up to 150 words with photographs to help tell the tale.

Modern storytellers, in the tradition of the hakawati, hark back to One Thousand and One Nights, The Decameron and The Canterbury Tales from contemporary scenarios as familiar as catching up with friends or lovers and gossiping with coworkers. New technologies bring a novel approach to this ancient, most human of artforms, the activity that distinguishes and consolidates culture: storytelling.

Fotohistorias is an initiative of Costa Rican web designer Diego Barracuda, who also develops alternative content on his blog, Nistua, and other websites.

Tagged: , ,