For your data to last forever all you have to do is store it in a diamond, or —if you don’t have a diamond at hand— a quartz.

We hardly notice the physical space where we store information —we generally think that it’s everywhere and that, because of technological developments, we will never have to worry about its decay. Currently, however, according to Hitachi researcher Kazuyoshi Tori, we are at a greater risk of losing information. Both CDs and hard drives have a lifespan of only a few decades, while technological acceleration means that hardware devices used to read information change even more frequently. Therefore, it is difficult to access a lot of the information we have stored —like some video or audio files, for instance

This has led Hitachi to become excited by a new form of data storage, based on a crystal quartz micro-screen that can withstand extreme temperatures and hostile conditions without deteriorating: lasting, technically, almost forever. This new technology stores information creating small holes on layers of quartz, which can be read with any ordinary microscope. Nearly any computer can be programmed to read the information; according to the researcher, regardless of how advanced computers become, they will always be able to read the information.

The prototype measures two square centimeters and is only two millimeters thick. Quartz is an extremely stable material; it can resist several chemicals and is not affected by radiation. It will survive tsunamis and fires; in other words, the only way of losing the information is by voluntarily destroying it.

Hitachi is coming close to discovering new ways of storing information within a trinomial of energy and matter ––where it is not created nor destroyed, but merely transformed; perhaps because this is also the original substrate of the universe.

For your data to last forever all you have to do is store it in a diamond, or —if you don’t have a diamond at hand— a quartz.

We hardly notice the physical space where we store information —we generally think that it’s everywhere and that, because of technological developments, we will never have to worry about its decay. Currently, however, according to Hitachi researcher Kazuyoshi Tori, we are at a greater risk of losing information. Both CDs and hard drives have a lifespan of only a few decades, while technological acceleration means that hardware devices used to read information change even more frequently. Therefore, it is difficult to access a lot of the information we have stored —like some video or audio files, for instance

This has led Hitachi to become excited by a new form of data storage, based on a crystal quartz micro-screen that can withstand extreme temperatures and hostile conditions without deteriorating: lasting, technically, almost forever. This new technology stores information creating small holes on layers of quartz, which can be read with any ordinary microscope. Nearly any computer can be programmed to read the information; according to the researcher, regardless of how advanced computers become, they will always be able to read the information.

The prototype measures two square centimeters and is only two millimeters thick. Quartz is an extremely stable material; it can resist several chemicals and is not affected by radiation. It will survive tsunamis and fires; in other words, the only way of losing the information is by voluntarily destroying it.

Hitachi is coming close to discovering new ways of storing information within a trinomial of energy and matter ––where it is not created nor destroyed, but merely transformed; perhaps because this is also the original substrate of the universe.

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