The well-recognized writer and philosopher Alain de Botton has founded a fascinating initiative known as The School of Life, or, in his words: “a new enterprise offering good ideas for everyday life.” The school has its physical campus in London, but relies mostly on the Internet to disseminate its many conferences and conversations in which scientists, researchers, artists and philosophers all have the chance to teach any curious visitor about their specialty.

In this video, Lawrence Krauss gives us what he calls a “secular sermon”: a chat in which he discusses the origin of the universe and how everything in the world is connected to every other thing––a hypothesis that the University of Arizona professor tests in his research.

“A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing?” is a sort of ironic play between the vastness of the cosmos and the insignificance (though vast in another way) of our own beings, a play between the incredible amount of knowledge we have about the world and, at the same time, our overwhelming ignorance of it.

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The well-recognized writer and philosopher Alain de Botton has founded a fascinating initiative known as The School of Life, or, in his words: “a new enterprise offering good ideas for everyday life.” The school has its physical campus in London, but relies mostly on the Internet to disseminate its many conferences and conversations in which scientists, researchers, artists and philosophers all have the chance to teach any curious visitor about their specialty.

In this video, Lawrence Krauss gives us what he calls a “secular sermon”: a chat in which he discusses the origin of the universe and how everything in the world is connected to every other thing––a hypothesis that the University of Arizona professor tests in his research.

“A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing?” is a sort of ironic play between the vastness of the cosmos and the insignificance (though vast in another way) of our own beings, a play between the incredible amount of knowledge we have about the world and, at the same time, our overwhelming ignorance of it.

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