For years, German director Werner Herzog, antihero and great film rebel, has imparted a series of courses not suitable for the “fainthearted”. It’s a film school where technique is not taught, where something beyond the basic is explored: that which drives cinematic creation.

Rogue Film School is the name of this series of seminars, imparted during  weekends by Herzog in different cities around the world. The participants hold dialogues around their aspirations, their doubts and projects. They discuss poetry, films, music, images and literature (there is a list of books and films which must be read and watched before taking the course). By the way, the director advises that anyone who is interested in learning filmmaking techniques should, instead, enroll themselves in their nearest film school.

Film segments selected by the director and, in some cases, segments chosen by the participants are analyzed during classes. Some of the themes which they explore are: film production and editing; the role of each scene within the narration of the story; the process of audience sensitization; how space is created in film and how this is perceived by the audience; how to design the illumination and the creation of what Herzog calls “the ecstasy of truth”; and, finally, how to narrate a story by stepping back from the Aristotelian three act structure.

It is mainly a practical school where participants lean the “athletic side of filmmaking”, which, according to the director, includes learning to force locks; travel by foot; know the euphoria of having someone shoot you without success; forge filming permits, neutralize bureaucracy, some guerrilla techniques and, in general, self-sufficiency and independence, which every  creator must have.

In his course description, Herzog warns that matters such as yoga, shamanic practices, nutritional values, herbal infusions, the discovery of personal limitations and inner growth will be off-limits.

The word rogue names a figure who does not live in a single place and who constantly defies the norms and conventions of the system he partakes in —one of the main characteristics of Herzog’s figure and work.  Thus, from its very name, this school exudes a spirit of rebellion and irreverence, foreign to the rules and conventions that nowadays invade the cinematographic work. This is a seminary that drives one to follow one’s own vision, without fear of solitude or isolation. At the same time, it is a school of inspiration, since a masterpiece, in any artistic discipline, can only exist as the product of a technique supported by the content and authenticity of what the artist wants to transmit.

In Herzog’s words, this is a school made exclusively “for those who have a sense for poetry. For those who are pilgrims. (…) For those who have a fire burning within. For those who have a dream.”

For years, German director Werner Herzog, antihero and great film rebel, has imparted a series of courses not suitable for the “fainthearted”. It’s a film school where technique is not taught, where something beyond the basic is explored: that which drives cinematic creation.

Rogue Film School is the name of this series of seminars, imparted during  weekends by Herzog in different cities around the world. The participants hold dialogues around their aspirations, their doubts and projects. They discuss poetry, films, music, images and literature (there is a list of books and films which must be read and watched before taking the course). By the way, the director advises that anyone who is interested in learning filmmaking techniques should, instead, enroll themselves in their nearest film school.

Film segments selected by the director and, in some cases, segments chosen by the participants are analyzed during classes. Some of the themes which they explore are: film production and editing; the role of each scene within the narration of the story; the process of audience sensitization; how space is created in film and how this is perceived by the audience; how to design the illumination and the creation of what Herzog calls “the ecstasy of truth”; and, finally, how to narrate a story by stepping back from the Aristotelian three act structure.

It is mainly a practical school where participants lean the “athletic side of filmmaking”, which, according to the director, includes learning to force locks; travel by foot; know the euphoria of having someone shoot you without success; forge filming permits, neutralize bureaucracy, some guerrilla techniques and, in general, self-sufficiency and independence, which every  creator must have.

In his course description, Herzog warns that matters such as yoga, shamanic practices, nutritional values, herbal infusions, the discovery of personal limitations and inner growth will be off-limits.

The word rogue names a figure who does not live in a single place and who constantly defies the norms and conventions of the system he partakes in —one of the main characteristics of Herzog’s figure and work.  Thus, from its very name, this school exudes a spirit of rebellion and irreverence, foreign to the rules and conventions that nowadays invade the cinematographic work. This is a seminary that drives one to follow one’s own vision, without fear of solitude or isolation. At the same time, it is a school of inspiration, since a masterpiece, in any artistic discipline, can only exist as the product of a technique supported by the content and authenticity of what the artist wants to transmit.

In Herzog’s words, this is a school made exclusively “for those who have a sense for poetry. For those who are pilgrims. (…) For those who have a fire burning within. For those who have a dream.”

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